piercem

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piercem@arizona.edu
Office
Learning Services Building
Office Hours
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Pierce, Mary L
Lecturer

Mary Lynn Pierce is currently an Adjunct Lecturer in the Department of Africana Studies, and History Department, at the University of Arizona, Tucson.  She graduated with a Ph.D. in History (Early Modern and Modern Europe, and World History) at the University of Arizona. Her research focuses on early modern and modern England, British and French colonialism in Africa, and the Ottoman Empire.  She is currently working on completing a monograph “Controversy in Seventeenth-Century English Coffeehouses: Transcultural Interactions with an Oriental Import.” In addition to writing reviews of books on religious and cultural practices in early modern Britain, she has also published several journal articles, including "Coffee made Cuckolds and Eunuchs: Emergence of an Ottoman Drink in 17th-Century English Society," Food Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal.

Currently Teaching

AFAS 209 – African American History (1440-1877)

This course evaluates the early experiences of peoples of African descent in North America. The culture of African captives, their daily lives under different slave regimes, slave resistance, free blacks, and emancipation are the main subjects addressed in this class.

This course evaluates the early experiences of peoples of African descent in North America. The culture of African captives, their daily lives under different slave regimes, slave resistance, free blacks, and emancipation are the main subjects addressed in this class.

This course evaluates the early experiences of peoples of African descent in North America. The culture of African captives, their daily lives under different slave regimes, slave resistance, free blacks, and emancipation are the main subjects addressed in this class.

AFAS 306 – African-American Autobiographies: Women and Their Histories

Students will gain insight into the historical and cultural factors that have created, and continue to perpetuate gender and ethnic inequity. Students will come to understand African American writers, particularly women, as historical agents and self-defined individuals. While the course will emphasize the multiple roles of African American women, as portrayed autobiographically it also incorporates the historical struggles of those around them. It is my goal that through the course material students will see how African Americans are constantly recreating themselves in the face of adversity.

Students will gain insight into the historical and cultural factors that have created, and continue to perpetuate gender and ethnic inequity. Students will come to understand African American writers, particularly women, as historical agents and self-defined individuals. While the course will emphasize the multiple roles of African American women, as portrayed autobiographically it also incorporates the historical struggles of those around them. It is my goal that through the course material students will see how African Americans are constantly recreating themselves in the face of adversity.

Students will gain insight into the historical and cultural factors that have created, and continue to perpetuate gender and ethnic inequity. Students will come to understand African American writers, particularly women, as historical agents and self-defined individuals. While the course will emphasize the multiple roles of African American women, as portrayed autobiographically it also incorporates the historical struggles of those around them. It is my goal that through the course material students will see how African Americans are constantly recreating themselves in the face of adversity.

AFAS 210 – African American History (1865-Present)

This course evaluates the experience of peoples of African descent in the United States after the Civil War. Reconstruction, "Jim Crow" segregation, "New Negro" Movement, Cold War, Civil Rights Movement, and the "Great Society" are the main subjects addressed in this class.

This course evaluates the experience of peoples of African descent in the United States after the Civil War. Reconstruction, "Jim Crow" segregation, "New Negro" Movement, Cold War, Civil Rights Movement, and the "Great Society" are the main subjects addressed in this class.